Email Election Part 4: Labour

The final party to go under the spotlight in our election series is the Labour Party. With the Lib Dems edging ahead of the Conservatives in our assessment of their email campaigning activities, could the current Government leapfrog them both in this final blog in our ‘Email Election’ series?

In the interests of true democracy, as with the Lib Dems and Conservatives, we’ve picked 2 emails sent by the Labour Party within the last week. These emails highlight the more strategic approach taken by Labour.

labour_smallThe first is the latest of Peter Mandelson’s weekly memos, published every Sunday, giving a run down of how the election is going so far.

The second is an email from Douglas Alexander (who? – a quick Google search tells us he’s an MP in Scotland, we live in Croydon), timed to coincide with the second live TV debate.

Throughout the Email Election we’ve judged all the parties’ emails against a set of criteria based on our ‘Hitting the Mark’ benchmark study.

Getting the call to action above the fold

As with the other two parties, the emails sent by the Labour party all take the form of a personal message from a senior figure in the party.

Peter Mandelson’s message, as with those sent by the Conservatives, is long. However, unlike the Tories, they have included a clear call to action in the first line – a text link to a microsite for recipients to donate to the party’s election fund. Further calls to action are also easy to find and therefore much more likely to result in donations for the party.

However, after this initial flourish the email becomes a bit bland, with lots of text and no images. Whilst the sentences and paragraphs are fairly short, making it easy to read, the copy could do with more sub-heads or bullet points to give it structure and help the reader navigate.

The email sent by Alexander is a much better length. This email is also devoid of any images, but the call to action is even more clear – a link to the party’s ‘debate dashboard’ that supporters can use to follow the debate and which encourages supporters to connect with the party digitally.

Keep it interesting

The strategy from the Labour party is clear: keep the email personal so that it looks as though it is a message that has been written and sent directly by the sender. However, building in some images or more structure would ensure that more recipients read right down to the bottom and hold interest.

The full scores for these two emails are below and when added to the scores for sign-up, the Labour party currently stands on 21.5 out of 35.election_tablev4-labour

So with the final results in, the winners of the email election are the Lib Dems on 26, followed by Labour 21.5 and the Conservatives 20.5. But will this result be replicated on Thursday…?